Human Interaction Network Ontology

Last uploaded: June 27, 2014
Preferred Name

HIV Infection

Definitions

Authored: Bukrinsky, M, D'Eustachio, P, Gillespie, ME, Gopinathrao, G, Iordanskiy, S, Morrow, MP, Matthews, L, Rice, AP, 0000-00-00 00:00:00 The global pandemic of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection has resulted in tens of millions of people infected by the virus and millions more affected. UNAIDS estimates around 40 million HIV/AIDS patients worldwide with 75% of them living in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary method of HIV infection is by sexual exposure while nonsexual HIV transmission also can occur through transfusion with contaminated blood products, injection drug use, occupational exposure,accidental needlesticks or mother-to-child transmission. HIV damages the immune system, leaving the infected person vulnerable to a variety of "opportunistic" infections arising from host immune impairment (Hare, 2004).<br>HIV-1 and the less common HIV-2 belong to the family of retroviruses. HIV-1 contains a single-stranded RNA genome that is 9 kilobases in length and contains 9 genes that encode 15 different proteins. These proteins are classified as: structural proteins (Gag, Pol, and Env), regulatory proteins (Tat and Rev), and accessory proteins (Vpu, Vpr, Vif, and Nef) (Frankel and Young,1998).<br><b>HIV infection </b>cycle can be divided into two phases:<br>1. An <b>Early phase</b> consisting of early events occuring after HIV infection of a susceptible target cell and a <br>2. <b>Late phase</b> comprising the later events in the HIV-infected cell resulting in the assembly of new infectious virions. The section titled <b>HIV lifecycle</b> consists of annotations of events in these two phases.<br>The virus has developed various molecular strategies to suppress the antiviral immune responses (innate, cellular and humoral) of the host. HIV-1 viral auxiliary proteins (Tat, Rev, Nef, Vif, Vpr and Vpu) play important roles in these host-pathogen interactions (Li et al.,2005). The section titled <b>Host interactions of HIV factors</b> will highlight these complex post-infection processes and the annotations will be released in near future.<br>

ID

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HINO_0015721

comment

Authored: Bukrinsky, M, D'Eustachio, P, Gillespie, ME, Gopinathrao, G, Iordanskiy, S, Morrow, MP, Matthews, L, Rice, AP, 0000-00-00 00:00:00

The global pandemic of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection has resulted in tens of millions of people infected by the virus and millions more affected. UNAIDS estimates around 40 million HIV/AIDS patients worldwide with 75% of them living in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary method of HIV infection is by sexual exposure while nonsexual HIV transmission also can occur through transfusion with contaminated blood products, injection drug use, occupational exposure,accidental needlesticks or mother-to-child transmission. HIV damages the immune system, leaving the infected person vulnerable to a variety of "opportunistic" infections arising from host immune impairment (Hare, 2004).
HIV-1 and the less common HIV-2 belong to the family of retroviruses. HIV-1 contains a single-stranded RNA genome that is 9 kilobases in length and contains 9 genes that encode 15 different proteins. These proteins are classified as: structural proteins (Gag, Pol, and Env), regulatory proteins (Tat and Rev), and accessory proteins (Vpu, Vpr, Vif, and Nef) (Frankel and Young,1998).
HIV infection cycle can be divided into two phases:
1. An Early phase consisting of early events occuring after HIV infection of a susceptible target cell and a
2. Late phase comprising the later events in the HIV-infected cell resulting in the assembly of new infectious virions. The section titled HIV lifecycle consists of annotations of events in these two phases.
The virus has developed various molecular strategies to suppress the antiviral immune responses (innate, cellular and humoral) of the host. HIV-1 viral auxiliary proteins (Tat, Rev, Nef, Vif, Vpr and Vpu) play important roles in these host-pathogen interactions (Li et al.,2005). The section titled Host interactions of HIV factors will highlight these complex post-infection processes and the annotations will be released in near future.

definition source

Reactome, http://www.reactome.org

Pubmed16354571

Pubmed9759480

label

HIV Infection

located_in

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/NCBITaxon_9606

prefixIRI

HINO:0015721

prefLabel

HIV Infection

seeAlso

ReactomeREACT_6185

Reactome Database ID Release 43162906

GENE ONTOLOGYGO:0016032

has_part

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HINO_0015724

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HINO_0015679

subClassOf

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/INO_0000021

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http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#HIV_Infection CSEO LOOM
http://www.owl-ontologies.com/unnamed.owl#RID15766 DERMLEX LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDDRA/10020161 MEDDRA LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/GSSO/000516 GSSO LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C3108 NCIT LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C3108 NCIT LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C3108 NCIT LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C3108 NCIT LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C3108 NCIT LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C3108 NCIT LOOM
http://purl.jp/bio/4/id/200906062810447763 IOBC LOOM
http://purl.jp/bio/4/id/200906062810447763 IOBC LOOM
http://purl.jp/bio/4/id/200906062810447763 IOBC LOOM
http://purl.jp/bio/4/id/200906062810447763 IOBC LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/MTHU020829 LOINC LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/CSP/1560-6305 CRISP LOOM
https://github.com/Superraptor/GSSO:000516 GSSO LOOM
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0000764 EFO LOOM
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0000764 CCONT LOOM
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0000764 EFO LOOM
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0000764 EFO LOOM
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0000764 EFO LOOM
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0000764 EFO LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/ICPC2P/B90002 ICPC2P LOOM