Human Interaction Network Ontology

Last uploaded: June 27, 2014
Preferred Name

Influenza Infection

Definitions

Edited: D'Eustachio, P, Gillespie, ME, 2006-01-07 21:50:17 Reviewed: Garcia-Sastre, A, Squires, B, 2006-10-30 21:55:36 For centuries influenza epidemics have plagued man, and influenza was probably the disease described by Hippocrates in 412 BC. Today it remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with large segments of the human population affected every year. Many animal species can be infected by influenza viruses, often with catastrophic consequences. A continuing threat is the possibility of a pandemic similar to that experienced in 1918, estimated to have been responsible for 50 million deaths worldwide.<p>Influenza viruses belong to the family of Orthomyxoviridae; viruses with segmented RNA genomes that are negative sense and single-stranded (Baltimore 1971).<p>Influenza virus strains are named according to their type (A, B, or C), the species from which the virus was isolated (omitted if human), location of isolate, the number of the isolate, the year of isolation, and in the case of influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) subtype. For example, the virus of H5N1 subtype isolated from chickens in Hong Kong in 1997 is: influenza A/chicken/Hong Kong/220/97(H5N1) virus. Currently 16 different hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) subtypes and 9 different neuraminidase (N1 to N9) subtypes are known for influenza A viruses. Most human disease is due to Influenza viruses of the A type, so the events of Influenza infection have been annotated in Reactome with reference to this type. Authored: Luo, F, Squires, B, Scheuermann, RH, 2006-01-05 15:13:12

ID

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HINO_0016018

comment

Edited: D'Eustachio, P, Gillespie, ME, 2006-01-07 21:50:17

Reviewed: Garcia-Sastre, A, Squires, B, 2006-10-30 21:55:36

For centuries influenza epidemics have plagued man, and influenza was probably the disease described by Hippocrates in 412 BC. Today it remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with large segments of the human population affected every year. Many animal species can be infected by influenza viruses, often with catastrophic consequences. A continuing threat is the possibility of a pandemic similar to that experienced in 1918, estimated to have been responsible for 50 million deaths worldwide.

Influenza viruses belong to the family of Orthomyxoviridae; viruses with segmented RNA genomes that are negative sense and single-stranded (Baltimore 1971).

Influenza virus strains are named according to their type (A, B, or C), the species from which the virus was isolated (omitted if human), location of isolate, the number of the isolate, the year of isolation, and in the case of influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) subtype. For example, the virus of H5N1 subtype isolated from chickens in Hong Kong in 1997 is: influenza A/chicken/Hong Kong/220/97(H5N1) virus. Currently 16 different hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) subtypes and 9 different neuraminidase (N1 to N9) subtypes are known for influenza A viruses. Most human disease is due to Influenza viruses of the A type, so the events of Influenza infection have been annotated in Reactome with reference to this type.

Authored: Luo, F, Squires, B, Scheuermann, RH, 2006-01-05 15:13:12

definition source

Reactome, http://www.reactome.org

Pubmed0

label

Influenza Infection

located_in

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/NCBITaxon_9606

prefixIRI

HINO:0016018

prefLabel

Influenza Infection

seeAlso

GENE ONTOLOGYGO:0019058

ReactomeREACT_6167

Reactome Database ID Release 43168254

has_part

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HINO_0016003

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HINO_0015979

subClassOf

http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/INO_0000021

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http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0001669 CCONT LOOM
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http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo/EFO_0001669 EFO LOOM
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